Boynton said volunteers in schools must submit to criminal background checks. But committee volunteers have never had to submit to criminal and financial background checks.

These volunteers will not have direct access to the money and will not be dispersing funds in any way, Boynton noted.

She added: The newspaper is doing a very good job looking at the applicants.

For each applicant, the Star-Banner checked Marion County court records, which show local arrests, criminal prosecutions and lawsuits; the official records recorded with the court clerks office, which include judgments, liens, court orders, deed transfers, mortgages and such; and federal bankruptcy court records.

The purpose: to bring to light any financial situations that might be relevant for the School Board to consider as it selects committee members.

One candidate withdrew his name from consideration when the paper asked him about his bankruptcy and arrests. This was before any story was published.

A second candidate, Carol Vought, withdrew on Wednesday after the Star-Banner inquired about her personal bankruptcy, which was made final less than a year ago.

A third, Paula Chaffin, withdrew on Friday afternoon, a few days after being asked about a 2010 foreclosure action.

Two other candidates have remained in the running after the paper inquired about financial troubles.

Marion Andy Lazar said his personal bankruptcy case, finalized in January, happened because he wound up paying mortgages on two houses. He tried to sell one but got caught in the housing slump.

Heidi Maier, whose bankruptcy was made final earlier this year, said she has learned life lessons some easier than others through the years. She hopes the School Board considers candidates strengths, experience and ideas when it fills the committee roster.

The School Board will choose 15 of the 71 remaining applicants to serve on the oversight committee. Each of the five board members will choose two sitting members and an alternate. The choices are expected to be made during a work session on Thursday.

Forming the committee was a condition of the 1-mill property tax that voters approved in November. The tax is expected to raise $15 million over four years, and the committee will be charged with oversight of that money.

Three candidates were late additions to the list:

Retired dentist Robert Dreyfus contacted the district when he saw his name was missing from the original list. He proved that his email application was sent to the district three days before the deadline but, for some reason, was not registered.

Virginia Wilson, a vice president with Florida Citizens Bank, sent an email six days before the deadline. But she later learned it hadnt been received because she mistakenly left the . out of the email address.

Robin Williams-Martinezs letter of interest and resume were postmarked Feb. 9, the deadline day.

In addition to the three candidates who withdrew because of the Star-Banners inquiries, a fourth stepped away for a different reason.

Will Thames told the district that he withdrew because he initially applied due to concerns for lack of business community input, but there is an excellent pool, according to an email he sent to the district.

Boynton said volunteers in schools must submit to criminal background checks. But committee volunteers have never had to submit to criminal and financial background checks.

These volunteers will not have direct access to the money and will not be dispersing funds in any way, Boynton noted.

She added: The newspaper is doing a very good job looking at the applicants.

For each applicant, the Star-Banner checked Marion County court records, which show local arrests, criminal prosecutions and lawsuits; the official records recorded with the court clerks office, which include judgments, liens, court orders, deed transfers, mortgages and such; and federal bankruptcy court records.

The purpose: to bring to light any financial situations that might be relevant for the School Board to consider as it selects committee members.

One candidate withdrew his name from consideration when the paper asked him about his bankruptcy and arrests. This was before any story was published.

A second candidate, Carol Vought, withdrew on Wednesday after the Star-Banner inquired about her personal bankruptcy, which was made final less than a year ago.

A third, Paula Chaffin, withdrew on Friday afternoon, a few days after being asked about a 2010 foreclosure action.

Two other candidates have remained in the running after the paper inquired about financial troubles.

Marion Andy Lazar said his personal bankruptcy case, finalized in January, happened because he wound up paying mortgages on two houses. He tried to sell one but got caught in the housing slump.

Heidi Maier, whose bankruptcy was made final earlier this year, said she has learned life lessons some easier than others through the years. She hopes the School Board considers candidates strengths, experience and ideas when it fills the committee roster.

The School Board will choose 15 of the 71 remaining applicants to serve on the oversight committee. Each of the five board members will choose two sitting members and an alternate. The choices are expected to be made during a work session on Thursday.

Forming the committee was a condition of the 1-mill property tax that voters approved in November. The tax is expected to raise $15 million over four years, and the committee will be charged with oversight of that money.

Three candidates were late additions to the list:

Retired dentist Robert Dreyfus contacted the district when he saw his name was missing from the original list. He proved that his email application was sent to the district three days before the deadline but, for some reason, was not registered.

Virginia Wilson, a vice president with Florida Citizens Bank, sent an email six days before the deadline. But she later learned it hadnt been received because she mistakenly left the . out of the email address.

Robin Williams-Martinezs letter of interest and resume were postmarked Feb. 9, the deadline day.

In addition to the three candidates who withdrew because of the Star-Banners inquiries, a fourth stepped away for a different reason.

Will Thames told the district that he withdrew because he initially applied due to concerns for lack of business community input, but there is an excellent pool, according to an email he sent to the district.

Contact Joe Callahan at 867-4113 or joe.callahan@starbanner.com. Follow him on Twitter @JoeOcalaNews.

LOS ANGELES (LALATE EXCLUSIVE) Todd Chrisley and Julie Chrisley were the subject of a report this month attempting to update readers about the Chrisleys bankruptcy proceedings. But the report, in mentioning a settlement proposal, comes up short on the details. Todd Chrisley filed for personal bankruptcy, and his company Chrisley Asset Management also filed for bankruptcy. Both cases got different bankruptcy trustees. And both trustees, in their respective matters, filed lawsuits against Julie Chrisley claiming alleged fraudulent transfer. Julie disputed the same.

Todd Chrisleys personal bankruptcy dispute could be coming to an end, but not the Chrisley Asset Management bankruptcy dispute, LALATE can exclusively report. In Todds personal bankruptcy case, Case Number Case No. 13-56132-MGD, the trustee had claimed that Todd illegally transferred his interest in a former condo to Julie Chrisley. The trustee claimed that Todd and Julie found a buyer of their Georgia condo which they had owned together. “When [Todd and Julie] found a buyer for the Gallery Condo, they planned to transfer the property out of the [Todds] name, in order for [Julie] to use the sale proceeds for her sole benefit. [Todds] interest in the Gallery Condo was transferred to … [Julie for] no consideration …. Instead [Julie] … used all of the sale proceeds to satisfy her separate individual tax debt. Just about four months later, [Todd] filed this bankruptcy case”. The trustee sued Julie seeking to recover Todd’s interest in the $586,300.00 condo as an allegedly illegal transfer by Todd to Julie to defraud a $23 million creditor. Julie disputed the allegations. Now that case has been presented with a settlement offer.

Kyle Chrisley Mug Shot Photos 2013
Kyle Chrisley Mug Shot Photo 1
Kyle Chrisley Mug Shot Photo 2
Kyle Chrisley Mug Shot Photo 3
Kyle Chrisley Mug Shot Photo 4

But a recent report about the Chrisleys fails to mention that Julie Chrisley is being sued still by the second bankruptcy trustee. In fact, the settlement offer in the first case states in clear language that it does not stop the pending ligation against Julie in the second case. The proposed settlement will allow [the first] Trustee [for Todds personal bankruptcy case] to close this case without awaiting for the outcome of CAMs bankruptcy case [Chrisleys Asset Management case] since Trustee [of the first case] is not administering any of CAMs assets or any transfer related to CAM. Julie has until February 12, 2015 to respond to the allegations in the second case.

Julie Chrisley, Todd Chrisley

Before Abraham Lincoln became our 16th US President, he was a business owner — and not always a successful one. His shop in New Salem failed leading to personal bankruptcy. He received a patent for his invention to lift riverboats over sand bars but never got the business off the ground. As a lawyer, he faced challenges with collections.

Despite the setbacks, he went on to become a state legislator, US Senator and an undeniably superb national leader who helped preserve our Union during the Civil War. This Presidents Day, as we celebrate what would have been his 206th birthday on February 12, its time to reflect on the character traits that made him great and how the same qualities can guide small business owners.

Honesty. Lincoln got the Honest Abe moniker because of his reputation for telling the truth and behaving with integrity. In a classic example, he mistakenly took six cents too much from a customer at his store and walked three miles the same day to return it.

The takeaway here is pretty obvious. Business owners who foster a culture of honesty and transparency will build the trust of customers and workers. There can be a surprisingly high cost to telling tall tales. When you exaggerate a metric, under-report an expense or are less than honest with a client or a member of your team, you create a false reality. Eventually, youll have to manage the fallout from inflating the truth.

Perseverance. As a lawyer, Lincoln was persistent, fearless and tireless in his business and political dealings. He never let his failures and disappointments stop him from moving forward.

Failures in business are unavoidable, but they can build character and allow you to learn and grow. A nose-to-the-grindstone mentality will enable you to continue working towards your goals. Committed entrepreneurs know that quitting or succumbing to ones failures is not an option.

Communication. Lincoln had a remarkable ability to communicate his vision and goals, and make his concepts simple and relevant to peoples concerns. He understood the importance of explaining why his approach to problem-solving was the better choice.

Entrepreneurs need to excel at communication, and be loud and clear about their goals. And, it doesnt hurt to be a great storyteller — an ability that propelled Lincoln into the White House. The keys are to know — really know — your audience, and target your message to meet their needs. You may never deliver a message as memorable as the Gettysburg address, but effective communication can help get your message interpreted correctly.

Vulnerability. Lincoln was never afraid to share his vulnerable side. He allowed himself to be photographed in times of great despair and wasnt uncomfortable sharing his grief with the nation when his son, Willie, died of tuberculosis.

In the business world, it can be hard to reveal your vulnerabilities. But accepting and sharing your mistakes will demonstrate that you dont need to be perfect at everything and therefore, neither do your employees. Sharing your vulnerable side can also strengthen connections with your peers and customers.

Lincolns impact on contemporary society is alive and well. Lest you have doubts, consider how often he is quoted! The many positive character traits that Lincoln displayed have the ability to impact all of us, lead to greater entrepreneurial success and serve to inspire the next generation.

~~lt;pgt;Hawaii contractor Canaan Construction Ltd. was known for giving lifetime warranties on its new homes amp; an uncommon industry practice. Last year, though, the company quietly shut down with at least $800,000 in unpaid debts.lt;/pgt;
lt;pgt;The debts were disclosed in a recent personal bankruptcy filing by company President Max Suiter. The Chapter 7 filing in January listed $2.2 million in debts, many of them tied to Canaan, and $24,000 in personal assets.lt;/pgt;
~~

In a new Action on Decision (AOD 2015-10), the IRS stated that it will not follow the Tax Courts 2004 Martinez decision, which had allowed a general partner to exclude cancellation of debt (COD) income from a partnership in bankruptcy. Mr. Martinez was a general partner who guaranteed the partnerships debt, and the bankruptcy court entered a court order approving a contribution by Mr. Martinez to partially fund the partnerships liabilities. The Tax Court Memorandum decision relied on the Section 108 bankruptcy exclusion for not imposing tax on the partners COD income. Although the statute applies the bankruptcy exclusion at the partner level, and the partner was not in personal bankruptcy, the court noted that the statutory text looked to whether the taxpayer was under the jurisdiction of the court that made the bankruptcy discharge. The court then held that Mr. Martinez was under such bankruptcy court jurisdiction since the bankruptcy court explicitly asserted its jurisdiction over Mr. Martinez through his status as a general partner and a guarantor on the partnership debt.

In its AOD, the IRS stated its litigation position that it will not follow the Tax Court Memorandum decision in this case as well as the related cases of Gracia, Mirarchi, and Price. The IRSs position is that a partner must be under the jurisdiction of the bankruptcy court as a debtor, citing the structure of Section 108 as well as stating that the statutory intent is to give relief only to partners who are debtors in bankruptcy in their individual capacities and need a fresh start.

The personal bankruptcy law could trigger up to 25,000 court cases.

It would not result in million of cases, as previously rumored, say insolvency and foreclosure experts, reports local Mediafax.

They base their estimations on the relatively small number of foreclosures of real estate guarantees owned by individuals.These amount to about 50,000 cases, half of which have already entered payment procedures in stages.

The total number of foreclosures amounts to 850,000 files.

Nobody wants this law, except for the individuals and the National Authority for Consumer Protection, but its time has come, said Arin Stanescu, president of the Romanian National Association of Insolvency Practitioners.

editor@romania-insider.com

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A house painter suspected of shooting and wounding a San Diego television sportscaster was in a dispute with the victim over work done on the reporters home, police said.

Authorities say Mike Montana, 54, fired multiple shots through the rear window of Kyle Kraskas silver Mercedes on Tuesday outside Kraskas house in the citys quiet, predominantly residential Scripps Ranch area.

San Diego police Lt. Scott Wahl said the dispute involved the painting of the KFMB-TV anchors house, but he didnt offer specifics.

The CBS affiliate said Wednesday that Kraskas injuries were serious but his prognosis is good. He was recovering at a hospital.

Todd Villalobos, a KFMB sports producer and friend of Kraska, told the station that Kraska hired Montana to paint the outside of his house. Kraska was dissatisfied with the work, paid the painter for what he had done, and the two agreed to part ways.

Months later, Montana began leaving notes on Kraskas door, Villalobos said, according to KFMB.

Montana surrendered to authorities after a SWAT standoff at his home in suburban El Cajon and was booked into San Diego County jail early Wednesday. He is scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday on a charge of attempted murder.

Montana identified himself as the self-employed owner of Superior Painting Corp. in a filing for personal bankruptcy protection in January 2014. He listed assets of $11,030, liabilities of $38,878 and monthly income of $2,012.

Superior Paintings California business license was suspended in October 2013 for an unpaid balance of $1,951, said Tami Grimes, a spokeswoman for the state Franchise Tax Board.

Jail records do not list an attorney for Montana, who didnt immediately respond to an email sent through jail system.

Kraska, 48, is the sports director at KFMB, where he has worked since 1999. He has been a fixture in San Diego homes as the stations evening sports anchor since 2003 and hosts the San Diego Chargers postgame show.

The Boston native previously worked for television stations in Los Angeles; Sarasota, Florida; Tampa, Florida; El Paso, Texas; and Albany, New York, according to a KFMB biography. He began his career as weekend sports anchor in Watertown, New York, during his senior year at Syracuse University.

San Diego police say the attack is unrelated to any other crimes and described it as targeted.

(The suspect) was looking for him, Wahl said. He wasnt looking for someone else. This was not random.

The shooting comes less than two months after a TV meteorologist in Texas was shot outside the station where he works.

Authorities said KCEN-TV meteorologist Patrick Crawford was in his car the morning of Dec. 17 when a gunman approached, yelled at him and shot him three times.

Crawford returned to the air four weeks later. Authorities are still looking for that gunman.

___

AP researcher Jennifer Farrar in New York contributed to this report.

GRAND JUNCTION More than a dozen creditors showed up at the Mesa County courthouse on Friday, some with the aid of walkers, canes or oxygen tanks, demanding to know what happened to the money they paid for future funeral services after a funeral home operator admitted she spent the money on a vacation and other personal expenses.

Rhonda Lynn Nelson, owner of the now-defunct Mesa Funeral Service, told officials she owes at least 30 people for prepaid funeral expenses. Nelson told a bankruptcy trustee on Friday that she went on vacation, bought her boyfriend a truck and paid his legal bills using money drawn from the funeral homes business checking account.

Nelson filed for personal bankruptcy in January, claiming more than $450,000 in debts.

The daughter of one creditor cursed at Nelson and was ejected from the meeting by Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Trustee Jared Walters.

Nelson testified that she spent their deposits on wages for herself and to pay the costs of the business. The money was never placed in a trust or used to buy funeral expense insurance, she said.

Nelson said she never intended to include the prepaid funeral contracts in bankruptcy and promised she would eventually return the deposits using money she earns from a future job. She is currently unemployed.

Mearl Sheldon, owner of Spanish Valley Mortuary in Moab, said Nelson owes him for embalming supplies and caskets he provided in anticipation of a business deal that would put him in control of Mesa Funeral Service.

“The Hungarian lesson should raise some red flags,”
Viktor Szabo, who helps oversee $12 billion in emerging-market
debt at Aberdeen Asset Management Plc, said by phone from London
on Tuesday. “While there may be valuable lessons in there, a
bank-sector shock similar to Hungary’s may jeopardize growth in
the region.”

Soaring Repayments

Borrowers across the region who turned to franc loans for
their lower interest rates face higher repayments and potential
foreclosures after the Swiss currency surged about 20 percent in
the past week.

Hungarian households, the government and municipalities
were shielded from an increase of as much as 1 trillion forint
($3.7 billion) in their debts, the Economy Ministry said in a
statement Wednesday. The central bank ordered lenders in
November to make financial arrangements for converting all $12
billion in foreign-currency mortgages, about two months before
the end of the Swiss National Bank’s exchange-rate cap.

“There is no good way to do this and the fact that it
needed to be done a lot sooner is paramount,” Daniel Hewitt, an
economist at Barclays Plc, said in e-mailed comments. Other
eastern European policy makers should also “do something,” he
said. “I am not sure there is a big rush however.”

The landmines Orban’s government stepped on during its
quest to rid the country of franc loans may deter some policy
makers. The biggest, according to Andras Balatoni, an economist
at ING Bank NV in Budapest, was allowing the repayment of franc
mortgages in a lump sum at a discounted exchange rate and
forcing lenders to swallow losses.

Collateral Damage

The move, announced in 2011, cost banks $1.7 billion, led
to a plunge in lending, returned the economy to recession and
triggered a sovereign-credit downgrade to junk. At the same
time, it removed the best-performing foreign-currency loans from
banks’ portfolios and saddled remaining borrowers with soaring
installments as the forint plunged. Most banks have been
unprofitable since 2010.

While Hungary also introduced other measures to split costs
among banks, the government and borrowers, those resembled more
of a “painkiller” compared with the conversion of the loans,
Balatoni said.

Hungary’s steps look “positive in the short-term because
of the franc’s appreciation but judging from the negative impact
on lending and investments it’s not looking so brilliant,”
Guillaume Tresca, a strategist at Credit Agricole CIB in Paris,
said by phone.

That’s not dissuading some.

Among potential solutions, Romania is open to a proposal
that would cap exchange-rate losses for borrowers at 20 percent
higher than when the loans were taken out and to converting the
full 9.8 billion lei ($2.5 billion) in outstanding franc loans,
Finance Minister Darius Valcov told lawmakers on Wednesday. He
added that he’d support the move as long as banks agree to it.

Some banks may be unable to take losses from the
conversions, said Nicolae Cinteza, head of financial supervision
at the central bank in Bucharest.

Immediate Conversion

Romanian Prime Minister Victor Ponta, reeling from a failed
run for the presidency in November and facing parliamentary
elections next year, said he supported an opposition proposal to
approve a personal bankruptcy law to help avert foreclosures.

In Croatia, Prime Minister Zoran Milanovic, who also faces
elections this year, proposed fixing the kuna’s rate on loans at
6.39 per franc for a year. That was the exchange rate before the
Swiss National Bank’s decision and about 20 percent below the
current level. Converting Swiss-franc loans to kuna may cut
Croatia’s currency reserves by 30 percent, central bank Governor
Boris Vujcic said on Wednesday.

The plan, which lawmakers may approve this week, calls for
lenders including UniCredit SpA’s Zagrebacka Banka dd and
Intesa Sanpaolo SpA’s Privredna Banka Zagreb dd, to swallow
losses. A 24,000-member association of Swiss-franc borrowers
demanded the immediate conversion of all credit at the exchange
rate at which the loans were extended.

Others are more cautious.

Poland, Serbia

Serbia’s central bank said on Jan. 19 that it was
monitoring the impact of the franc’s surge on $1.2 billion of
such loans, pledging to coordinate any action with banks. A
borrowers’ association has called on the central bank and
lenders to fix the dinar rate against the franc at 15 percent
below the market rate on loans.

In Poland, where 575,000 franc borrowers hold $35 billion
in such loans, policy makers are counting on banks such as PKO
Bank Polski SA and Raiffeisen Bank International AG’s local unit
to pass on Switzerland’s negative interest rates to partially
blunt the pain from rising repayments.

Central bank Governor Marek Belka ruled out forcing banks
to convert loans to zloty, calling it “dangerous” and
estimating the cost to lenders at $2.7 billion. The quality of
Polish franc loans was “good,” Finance Minister Mateusz
Szczurek told TVN24 BiS on Tuesday.

Tight Race

Hungary’s methods “crippled its banking sector, stifled
credit growth, undermined the legitimacy of contract law and
stunted the long-run potential growth of the country,” Phoenix
Kalen, a strategist at Societe Generale SA in London, said by
phone. Poland’s approach has been “more conducive to promoting
investor confidence and long-term financial stability.”

With Poland gearing up for a tight parliamentary election
this year, it may not be the last word, according to Demetrios
Efstathiou, a strategist at Standard Bank Plc. The opposition
Law and Justice party called last week for allowing borrowers to
pay off their Swiss-franc loans at the Jan. 14 exchange rate, a
21 percent discount.

Politicians will “get involved, in an effort to provide a
once-and-for-all solution to the problem, just like Prime
Minister Orban did in Hungary,” Efstathiou said in e-mailed
comments. “Non-performing loans will rise, banking sector
lending growth will stall, and economic growth will slow.”

To contact the reporter on this story:
Zoltan Simon in Budapest at
zsimon@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
Balazs Penz at
bpenz@bloomberg.net
Andras Gergely, Andrew Langley